Golf Made Simple Blog

The Weakest Part Of My Game

Why do all great Players say that the weakest part of their game is their short game and the vast majority of Monkey’s say that the weakest part of their game is their long game?

Or let me explain it this way – Do you know how many times I’ve seen a golfer have more than 34 putts during a round of golf? Well, to give you an idea of how many times I’ve seen golfers ruin their score by taking an excessive number of putts – pick a number between 1 and 9 and then add as many zero’s after that number as you can picture (oh, and then add a couple more zero’s after that). And with the consistency of the sun rising in the east and setting in the west, this golfer will look at their scorecard, read out loud that they scored 97 and then with the conviction of a politician say – “If I could just hit my Driver and long irons better, all my problems would be solved!”

And that opens the door for me to quote to you one of the most profound statements that has ever been uttered on American television by the classic actor Gary Coleman – “What-a-you talkin about Willis?”

And I know what many people are going to say – “But Marc, these great players hit the ball 280-yards every time. I only hit my Driver 240-yards. Of course that’s the strong part of their game.” Yes, I agree that they hit the ball farther than you, I also would like to add to the fact that they’re playing from tees that are a collective 7,100 yards away from the middle of the greens on that golf course and you are playing from somewhere around 6,300 yards away.

So if the best Players are playing golf courses that are 800-yards longer than yours and that you Drive the golf ball with your Driver on 14 of those holes (4-holes are par 3’s that may add 100-yards to the total difference between your tees) – the Player needs to hit their ball – 700 yards divided by 14 drives equals 50-yards farther than you on every hole for you both to be in the same place on the fairway. So in reality if you we’re playing from your tees and a Player was playing from their tees and you both hit your average drive – your ball would still be 10-yards farther out on the fairway than their golf ball.

If you’re confused, the next paragraph has an example that should make this crystal clear for you.

For example – The Player is hitting from tees that play 450-yards to the center of the green and you’re playing from tees that are 400-yards away. The Player hits their average drive of 280-yards, leaving them with a 170-yard shot to the center of the green. You hit your average drive of 240-yards, leaving you with only 160-yards to the green.

Then as we continue the hole, you have a 6-iron from 160-yards and because the Player is 10-yards farther away, they also have a 6-iron, though it’s from 170-yards. For your 2nd shot on this hole, you hit the ball exactly 160-yards, but just a bit right into the sand bunker next to the green and they hit their ball 170-yards and just a bit left into the rough next to the green. You get your first shot out of the sand and onto the green about 15-feet from the hole (pretty good shot out of the sand and you’re excited about not just getting out in 1-shot and onto the green, but you’re really happy you got it so close). The Player wedges onto the green to 5-feet away from the hole (and they’re not too happy about it, they wanted to get a couple feet closer).

You make a great 1st putt that just misses the hole and you tap-in for a 5 (bogey). The Player makes a “shakey” putt that just barely finds the inside edge of the hole and falls in for a 4 (par).

You then walk to your cart saying to yourself – “If I could only hit my Driver and mid-irons better, I could’ve made par.” The Player walks to the cart saying – “That was close, I really need to work on my shots around the green and my 5-footers.”

Next hole – Similar scenario and similar results.

The next hole after that – again similar scenario and similar results.

And the next 15-holes – Basically the same thing, with maybe 2 or 3 below average drives by both of you.

So after 18-holes, you and the Player both have hit the golf ball pretty similar with your Driver and Irons, yet the Player scored 72 and you scored 90. And the Monkey says – “If I could just hit my Driver and mid irons better, all my problems would be solved!” And that’s false! And if you continue to believe that, you’ll continue to say that same exact sentence everytime you’re on the golf course for the next 50-years! You both hit the ball the same way, yet the Player parred every hole and you bogeyed every hole – which results in them being a 0-handicap and you being an 18-handicap.

Why? And how’s it possible that you hit the ball as well as a 0-handicap, yet you scored 18-shots higher and are considered just an average golfer as opposed to being able to live the glory of being a 0-handicap or even a single digit PLAYER? People look at single digit Players much differently than they do 18-handicap Golfers. Yet, the main difference is around the greens.

The Player used 2-key elements that you don’t have!

The Player had a PLAN and a Short Game! Yet, all you want to do is work on your Driver and long irons to score better. All the Player wants to do is work on their short game to score better. PLAN? What PLAN did the Player have in the scenario above – The Player knew to aim to the left side of the flag, because if they had missed they’re shot, they knew they had an easy short wedge to get the ball within 5-feet. You aimed at the flag thinking that you would hit the perfect 6-iron and made the task of getting within 15-feet out of the bunker into a marvelous feat!

Let’s see – Whose philosophy about playing better golf and having more fun on the golf course seems to be more successful so far? My best answer for you is to become a PLAYER like Barry Barrett of Lexington, Kentucky!

Regards,

Marc – Your Instructor for Life
Golf Made Simple!

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